Sarah Richdon

Sarah Richdon

Jan 03, 2018

Group 6 Copy 185
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References
  • 1. Frankel, O. H. (1977). Natural Variation and Its Conservation. Genetic Diversity in Plants, 21–44. doi:10.1007/978-1-4684-2886-5_4
  • 2. Frankham, R., Ballou, J. D., & Briscoe, D. A. (2009). Introduction to Conservation Genetics. doi:10.1017/cbo9780511809002
  • 3. Ralls, K., & Ballou, J. (1986). Captive breeding programs for populations with a small number of founders. Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 1(1), 19–22. doi:10.1016/0169-5347(86)90062-5
  • 4. Frankham, R. (2005). Genetics and extinction. Biological Conservation, 126(2), 131–140. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2005.05.002
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    About This Project

    Livingstone's fruit bats (Pteropus livingstonii) are one of the rarest bats in the world, with only 1260 left in the wild. A captive breeding program of 71 individuals exists as a safeguard against extinction.

    Funding would enable the vital investigation of relatedness in captive bats, allowing for the prevention of inbreeding, the assessment of hereditary diseases, the comparison of wild and captive genetics and ensure the continued success of the captive breeding program.

    Blast off!

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