researcher
Sean McCann

Sean McCann

Toronto, ON

University of Toronto

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Haven't backed any projects yet! 

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On second glance, I see that they have been reported in the state http://www.dodgeglobe.com/article/20110812/NEWS/308129992 however, the record may represent further spread, and may be noteworthy.
Aug 14, 2017
Performance-enhancing substances: How do male black widows use chemical cues to gain a competitive advantage?
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I think if it is a brown widow it might be useful to bring it by a university or museum, as I do not believe they are reported yet for Kansas (they are invasive). Black widows are highly variable though, and it could be that you have a lighter coloured specimen of a western or northern widow spider. I believe Rick Vetter is tracking the spread of brown widow in the USA, and you may want to photograph you spider and send it to him. His contact info can be found here: http://cisr.ucr.edu/brown_widow_spider.html
Aug 14, 2017
Performance-enhancing substances: How do male black widows use chemical cues to gain a competitive advantage?
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So far, it is looking pretty good! Hopefully we can get this funded and then start with the planning of a full scale spider season.
Oct 24, 2016
Performance-enhancing substances: How do male black widows use chemical cues to gain a competitive advantage?
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We love the pinecone research! Such great methodology and results!
Oct 24, 2016
Performance-enhancing substances: How do male black widows use chemical cues to gain a competitive advantage?
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As to detection limits, we have data from this year that up to 50 m is possible with a good wind, and possibly further as well.
Oct 05, 2016
Performance-enhancing substances: How do male black widows use chemical cues to gain a competitive advantage?
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In our 2013 project at Island View Beach, our female silk-baited traps caught hundreds of males on the first night, on the second night there were very few caught. With lethal trapping, this might be a means of denying females matings and controlling a population. Alternatively, flooding an area with a synthesized synthetic may prevent males from finding females, and result in mating disruption. It is possible anyway, though to our knowledge such control has never been tried in spiders.
Oct 05, 2016
Performance-enhancing substances: How do male black widows use chemical cues to gain a competitive advantage?
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1) I read some science blogs, especially smallpondscience.com, spiderbytes.org, arthropodecology.com, myrmecos.net 2) I am mostly finding content and blogs through twitter 3) I like posts on natural history, especially backyard or local observations, but also about remote fieldwork. 4) smallpondscience.com: Terry McGlynn really helps when navigating career moves, and dealing with academia and teaching in general, spyderbytes.org: Catherine Scott shows me how to really flesh out a natural history post, arthropodecology.com: Chris Buddle brings me Canada-relevant research, and good insights into longer-term studies, myrmecos.net: Alex Wild does a great job with fascinating ant species, as well as navigating the dual job of being an academic as well as a photographer
Sep 25, 2015
Oh My Science Blog! Who reads science blogs, and why?
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