Grant Eaton

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But I came to regret introducing to my neurologist friend to DMT. A few days after his first two sacred experiences with DMT, he came onto me and we had a sexual encounter. In the middle of that encounter he haughtily demanded “get me the DMT!” three times because he wanted to experience it right then (and while simultaneously being high on a recreational dose of the drug Ambien as I would later learn). I was appalled. I had introduced this physician to DMT and made it clear that this was a tool to be regarded as *sacred* and with *enormous therapeutic potential.* However my neurologist friend want to have his third DMT journey as if it were an amyl nitrite ‘popper’ meant to enhance sexual experience, not to mention combining DMT with a prescription drug he’d taken recreationally without my knowing. I was ashamed by his attitude and denied his demand for DMT. My respect for him was eroded our friendship ended for this and other ethical differences. I don’t see DMT as something to be used this manner. I share the above story because it shows how DMT is not ready to be experienced by everyone. I think the overwhelming majority of scientists and patients working with DMT are going about their work with humility, gratitude, and respect. But there are a few bad apples out there. As my experience with this particular neurologist taught me, just because someone spent 12 years in medical school and residency, and holds a prestigious and influential position, does *not* automatically mean they have the character to recognize the value to humanity in this molecule. Not all doctors are truly healers. Best regards to you and good luck in your research!
Oct 18, 2014
Why does our body produce one of the most potent hallucinogens?
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Second story: I once made a couple vaporized DMT experiences possible for an influential Italian neurologist friend who I hoped could recognize the potential therapeutic benefits of DMT. Specifically, Ayahuasca in ceremonial form could be therapeutic for Parkinson's patients suffering depression and questioning the purpose of continuing with life—for instance, the late comedian Robin Williams who committed suicide not long after being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease was an individual who potentially could have reaped enormous personal benefits from Ayahuasca. Ayahuasca may have some unique therapeutic implications for Parkinson’s patients as described by a patient named Sylvia who was a dancer before the disease struck her, and this use of Ayahuasca would be worth the medical community exploring. See http://alistairappleton.com/blog/?cat=6&paged=2 My neurologist friend had two vaporized experiences under my care. During the first one he was ‘gone’ five minutes. When he came back he spoke to me for *an hour* about the gorgeous patterns and lights he saw in the tunnel made of light. He remarked with astonishment, “These things could not possibly have originated in my own mind.” Clearly nothing in his medical training in Italy had prepared him for could happen with DMT. On his second experience with DMT that same night, he was gone eight minutes and he met many beings made of light. “It’s like they’re throwing a party for you, isn’t it?” I suggested of the beings and their exuberant mannerisms, a description he eagerly agreed with. My neurologist-friend was dumbfounded in some ways and struggled to put the experience into words (as nearly all DMT users struggle to articulate the ineffable). As with the first time, he tried to speak for 30-45 minutes to explain what happened in the eight minutes he was ‘gone.’ He was both confounded and enamoured of the experience. A great mystery had been revealed to him that medical school hadn’t even touched on.
Oct 18, 2014
Why does our body produce one of the most potent hallucinogens?
View comment
I made a small donation and have two stories to share for your edutainment. First story: Although it’s not seen as scientific to speculate about ideas which cannot be supported by material evidence, I think it’s helpful to consider ‘to where’ bursts of endogenous or exogenous DMT might be catapulting our consciousness. Many of us come to regard DMT as lifting the veil on the mystery of death. It seems to me to be a direct experience inside the Bardo, the realm spoken of in the Tibetan Book of the Dead as an intermediary state consciousness experiences in between material incarnations—in the same way a wave re-experiences the entire ocean each time it collapses form. Terence McKenna once gave DMT to “one of the top 5” Tibetan lamas who reportedly came back from his journey remarking soberly, ‘It is the 'lesser lights.’ It is the furthest you can go [into the Bardo] without dying.” It’s worth considering the possibility that consciousness *could be* an energetic field from which all matter whatsoever arises. According to this idea, the brain behaves like a receiver of that field and it creates the impression of discrete (individual) consciousness experiences within a consensus reality. In other words it might be that we are each us directly ‘God’ pretending we’re not, by having apparently separate material experiences when in actuality we are more deeply connected than we can possibly realise. It could be we are all the same being having discrete incarnate experiences simultaneously. A sustained DMT journey with Ayahuasca is enough to see this much.
Oct 18, 2014
Why does our body produce one of the most potent hallucinogens?
View comment
But I came to regret introducing to my neurologist friend to DMT. A few days after his first two sacred experiences with DMT, he came onto me and we had a sexual encounter. In the middle of that encounter he haughtily demanded “get me the DMT!” three times so that he could experience it while having sex and simultaneously being high on a recreational dose of the drug Ambien. I was appalled by his request because the manner in which I had introduced him to DMT made it clear that this was a tool to be regarded as *sacred* and with *enormous therapeutic potential.* However my neurologist friend insisted on having a third DMT journey as if it were an amyl nitrite ‘popper’ meant to enhance his sexual experience, not to mention combining DMT with a prescription drug he’d taken recreationally without my knowing. I was appalled to the core by his attitude and denied his demand for DMT. My respect for him was eroded our friendship ended for this and other ethical differences. I don’t in any way see DMT as something I would mix with a sexual encounter or the sleeping medication Ambien. I share the above story because it shows how DMT is not ready to be experienced by everyone. I think the overwhelming majority of scientists and patients working with DMT are going about their work with humility, gratitude, and respect. But there are a few bad apples out there. As my experience with this particular neurologist taught me, just because someone spent 12 years in medical school and residency, and holds a prestigious and influential position, does *not* automatically mean they have the character to recognize the value to humanity in this molecule. Not all doctors are truly healers. Best regards to you and good luck in your research!
Oct 18, 2014
Why does our body produce one of the most potent hallucinogens?
View comment
Second story: I once made a couple vaporized DMT experiences possible for an influential Italian neurologist friend who I hoped could recognize the potential therapeutic benefits of DMT. Specifically, Ayahuasca in ceremonial form could be therapeutic for Parkinson's patients suffering depression and questioning the purpose of continuing with life—for instance, the late comedian Robin Williams who committed suicide not long after being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease was an individual who potentially could have reaped enormous personal benefits from Ayahuasca. Ayahuasca may have some unique therapeutic implications for Parkinson’s patients as described by a patient named Sylvia who was a dancer before the disease struck her, and this use of Ayahuasca would be worth the medical community exploring. See http://alistairappleton.com/blog/?cat=6&paged=2 My neurologist friend had two vaporized experiences under my care. During the first one he was ‘gone’ five minutes. When he came back he spoke to me for *an hour* about the gorgeous patterns and lights he saw in the tunnel made of light. He remarked with astonishment, “These things could not possibly have originated in my own mind.” Clearly nothing in his medical training in Italy had prepared him for could happen with DMT. On his second experience with DMT that same night, he was gone eight minutes and he met many beings made of light. “It’s like they’re throwing a party for you, isn’t it?” I suggested of the beings and their exuberant mannerisms, a description he eagerly agreed with. My neurologist-friend was dumbfounded in some ways and struggled to put the experience into words (as nearly all DMT users struggle to articulate the ineffable). As with the first time, he tried to speak for 30-45 minutes to explain what happened in the eight minutes he was ‘gone.’ He was both confounded and enamoured of the experience. A great mystery had been revealed to him that medical school hadn’t even touched on.
Oct 18, 2014
Why does our body produce one of the most potent hallucinogens?
View comment
I made a small donation and have two stories to share for your edutainment. First story: Although it’s not seen as scientific to speculate about ideas which cannot be supported by material evidence, I think it’s helpful to consider ‘to where’ bursts of endogenous or exogenous DMT might be catapulting our consciousness. Many of us come to regard DMT as lifting the veil on the mystery of death. It seems to me to be a direct experience inside the Bardo, the realm spoken of in the Tibetan Book of the Dead as an intermediary state consciousness experiences in between material incarnations—in the same way a wave re-experiences the entire ocean each time it collapses form. Terence McKenna once gave DMT to “one of the top 5” Tibetan lamas who reportedly came back from his journey remarking soberly, ‘It is the 'lesser lights.’ It is the furthest you can go [into the Bardo] without dying.” It’s worth considering the possibility that consciousness *could be* an energetic field from which all matter whatsoever arises. According to this idea, the brain behaves like a receiver of that field and it creates the impression of discrete (individual) consciousness experiences within a consensus reality. In other words it might be that we are each us directly ‘God’ pretending we’re not, by having apparently separate material experiences when in actuality we are more deeply connected than we can possibly realise. It could be we are all the same being having discrete incarnate experiences simultaneously. A sustained DMT journey with Ayahuasca is enough to see this much.
Oct 18, 2014
Why does our body produce one of the most potent hallucinogens?
View comment
Second story: I once made a couple vaporized DMT experiences possible for an influential Italian neurologist friend who I hoped could recognize the potential therapeutic benefits of DMT. Specifically, Ayahuasca in ceremonial form could be therapeutic for Parkinson's patients suffering depression and questioning the purpose of continuing with life—for instance, the late comedian Robin Williams who committed suicide not long after being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease was an individual who potentially could have reaped enormous personal benefits from Ayahuasca. Ayahuasca may have some unique therapeutic implications for Parkinson’s patients as described by a patient named Sylvia who was a dancer before the disease struck her, and this use of Ayahuasca would be worth the medical community exploring. See http://alistairappleton.com/blog/?cat=6&paged=2 My neurologist friend had two vaporized experiences under my care. During the first one he was ‘gone’ five minutes. When he came back he spoke to me for *an hour* about the gorgeous patterns and lights he saw in the tunnel made of light. He remarked with astonishment, “These things could not possibly have originated in my own mind.” Clearly nothing in his medical training in Italy had prepared him for could happen with DMT. On his second experience with DMT that same night, he was gone eight minutes and he met many beings made of light. “It’s like they’re throwing a party for you, isn’t it?” I suggested of the beings and their exuberant mannerisms, a description he eagerly agreed with. My neurologist-friend was dumbfounded in some ways and struggled to put the experience into words (as nearly all DMT users struggle to articulate the ineffable). As with the first time, he tried to speak for 30-45 minutes to explain what happened in the eight minutes he was ‘gone.’ He was both confounded and enamoured of the experience. A great mystery had been revealed to him that medical school hadn’t even touched on.
Oct 18, 2014
Why does our body produce one of the most potent hallucinogens?
View comment
I made a small donation and have two stories to share for your edutainment. First story: Although it’s not seen as scientific to speculate about ideas which cannot be supported by material evidence, I think it’s helpful to consider ‘to where’ bursts of endogenous or exogenous DMT might be catapulting our consciousness. Many of us come to regard DMT as lifting the veil on the mystery of death. It seems to me to be a direct experience inside the Bardo, the realm spoken of in the Tibetan Book of the Dead as an intermediary state consciousness experiences in between material incarnations—in the same way a wave re-experiences the entire ocean each time it collapses form. Terence McKenna once gave DMT to “one of the top 5” Tibetan lamas who reportedly came back from his journey remarking soberly, ‘It is the 'lesser lights.’ It is the furthest you can go [into the Bardo] without dying.” It’s worth considering the possibility that consciousness *could be* an energetic field from which all matter whatsoever arises. According to this idea, the brain behaves like a receiver of that field and it creates the impression of discrete (individual) consciousness experiences within a consensus reality. In other words it might be that we are each us directly ‘God’ pretending we’re not, by having apparently separate material experiences when in actuality we are more deeply connected than we can possibly realise. It could be we are all the same being having discrete incarnate experiences simultaneously. A sustained DMT journey with Ayahuasca is enough to see this much.
Oct 18, 2014
Why does our body produce one of the most potent hallucinogens?
View comment