Chloe Deodato

Chloe Deodato

Seattle, WA

More

Haven't created any projects yet! 

Mr. Williamson, Thank you for your comment and concerns about our project. We may be surrounded by salt water, but Seattle is a large city with a lot of processed freshwater effluent being released into the marine Puget Sound daily. This nutrient-rich effluent is a potential cause of several types of harmful algal blooms (aka. red tides) in the ocean and Puget Sound that kill finfish (salmon) and shellfish (oysters, mussels), as well as halt fertilization and embryonic development of sea urchins. These are major industries in the Pacific Northwest and sustain considerable damage every summer during the harmful algal bloom season. Red tides also affect human beings, ie. paralytic shellfish poisoning and others. Many beaches are closed to recreational shellfish harvesting every year when the toxin concentration is high in shellfish tissues. Dr. Rose Ann Cattolico has been studying algae for over 40 years and our lab has an extensive algae culture collection of marine and freshwater species. There are many potential candidates in this collection, including freshwater, marine and brackish water species. Most cyanobacteria and green algae do not naturally make oils as photosynthetic products, but our brown algae do and in high quantities. This particular freshwater species is halo-tolerant and is considered by scientists in the industry to be an excellent candidate for an algal standard by which to measure lipid production of other strains for the algae biofuel industry and a model system to study algal lipid biogenesis. We not only want to make biofuel and bioproducts using our freshwater algae, but also bioremediate the nutrient-rich freshwater effluent before it is released into Puget Sound. Therefore, we will create local, sustainable energy and co-products and lessen damaging effects on the marine environment that surrounds us. We want to show that making local biofuel, instead of relying upon fuel produced in other regions of the US, is a viable option here in Seattle and other temperate regions of the world. Please join us in our quest to change the views of the current algae biofuel industry! Sincerely, Chloe Deodato
Jul 10, 2014
Can you make algae biofuel in cool, cloudy Western Washington?
View comment
Thank you, Ate! We will do our best!
Jul 09, 2014
Can you make algae biofuel in cool, cloudy Western Washington?
View comment
Thank you for your donation! Yes, we can and with new extraction methods being developed, the cost is going down. Please spread the word!
Jul 01, 2014
Can you make algae biofuel in cool, cloudy Western Washington?
View comment
As a young breast cancer survivor, I thank you for doing this research. Please check out my project on algae biofuels, too.
Jun 30, 2014
How can a test help treat each cancer patient the right way?
View comment
Thank you, Cindy! Please spread the word!
Jun 30, 2014
Can you make algae biofuel in cool, cloudy Western Washington?
View comment
Two more donations this morning. Thank you! Spread the word to others who may be interested.
Jun 23, 2014
Can you make algae biofuel in cool, cloudy Western Washington?
View comment
We have our first donation! Thank you, Katie!
Jun 17, 2014
Can you make algae biofuel in cool, cloudy Western Washington?
View comment