Vickram Andrew Manoharan

Vickram Andrew Manoharan

Lowell, MA

University of Massachusetts Lowell

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Yes, we are aware of this evidence. There seems to be some confusion. Unfortunately, the good people at 'Experiment.com' have created the title you are referring to and published their interpretation of it for their Weekly Digest. "X-rays may reveal that female mosquitos evolved a proboscis for eating nectar from flowers" is what they rewrote the title as and is what you are referring to. This is incorrect information and not what we are suggesting. Please visit our current page to learn more about our original ideas. We are waiting on them to correct their mistake. Thank you for your question! Please let us know if you have any more.
Sep 29, 2019
Using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to characterize the proboscis of mosquitoes
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The basis of our assumption stems from the behavior of the female mosquito. The proboscis of the female is used to penetrate animal epithelium in order to effectively take a blood meal. Plant-feeding males do not feed on blood, so the expectation is that their proboscis would not require the rigidity or flexibility characteristics of females. Additionally, most arthropods have been found to have transition and/or earth metals in their exoskeleton, often concentrated in regions that function in crushing/piercing prey. Since only females feed on blood, we hypothesize they are more likely to have metals in their mouthparts, which is an adaptation to feeding. However, the possibility that males also possess metals in their proboscis must be explored to determine if in fact females truly differ.
Sep 28, 2019
Using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to characterize the proboscis of mosquitoes
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