How does the SFFA v. Harvard federal court case decision affect perceived norms?

Princeton, New Jersey
Psychology
DOI: 10.18258/12615
$875
Raised of $875 Goal
100%
Funded on 2/27/19
Successfully Funded
  • $875
    pledged
  • 100%
    funded
  • Funded
    on 2/27/19

About This Project

My experiment builds on the results that the SCOTUS decision regarding gay marriage changed perceived social norms in favor of gay marriage, but did not affect personal attitudes. My hypothesis is SFFA v. Harvard, which addresses whether Asian-Americans are treated fairly during the college application process, will have a significant impact on perceived societal norms, but not on personal norms.

Ask the Scientists

Join The Discussion

What is the context of this research?

In 2017, researchers measuring the impact of the 2015 Supreme Court case regarding gay marriage found that perceived social norms changed in response to the decision, although personal norms did not. More broadly, that study sought to better understand whether certain factors, such as institutional decisions, have a significant impact on perceived social norms. My study explores whether the same effect is found with a different case, the SFFA v. Harvard federal court case, regarding whether Asian-Americans are treated fairly during the college application process.

What is the significance of this project?

Social norm experiments, such as this one, allow researchers and policymakers to better understand which sources influence perceived norms, and how significant of an impact each of these channels have on individuals’ perceived norms. Perceived social norms have been shown to impact personal behavior. Therefore, the manipulation of perceived norms has the potential to change personal behavior. This experiment will provide insight as to whether institutional decisions significantly alter perceived norms, which would imply that the manipulation of institutional decisions either would or would not impact personal behavior.

What are the goals of the project?

The first wave of surveys will be sent out before the SFFA v. Harvard decision is announced. The next wave of surveys will be sent out within a week of the decision being announced. The third wave will be sent out 2-3 weeks after wave two.

The participants for this study will include a random sample of Americans, recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk, as well as a group of teachers. The final sample size is estimated to be 200 Mechanical Turk users and 50 teachers.

The results of this study can be used to better understand the impact of an institutional decision on perceived norms. I hypothesize that the results will be in agreement with the 2017 study that found that institutional decisions significantly impact perceived norms.

Budget

Please wait...

For the Wave One survey, 500 participants will be each be compensated 45¢.

For the Wave Two and Three surveys, 250 participants are anticipated, based on the 50% retention rate for Tankard & Paluck (2017). Participants will be compensated 80¢ for Wave Two and Three Surveys.

Participant data can only be used if all three surveys are completed, therefore participants are given a $1 bonus for completing all three surveys.

Endorsed by

This project is the product of a dedicated student seeking to answer an essential question about perceived norms. Ella has dedicated the last year to developing an ethically sound and well controlled experiment. I fully endorse her endeavor and hope that you will share in the support.

Flag iconProject Timeline

Data collection from the 200 Mechanical Turk participants and 50 teachers will span from early February to 3-4 weeks after the SFFA v. Harvard decision is announced. The first survey will be sent out in early February and the timing of the 2nd and 3rd surveys depends on the date that the decision comes out.

Following data collection, the results will be analyzed during late spring and summer.

Final data will be presented by Fall 2019.

Feb 13, 2019

Project Launched

Mar 01, 2019

Send out Wave One Survey

Apr 01, 2019

Send out Wave Two Survey

Apr 19, 2019

Send out Wave Three Survey

Sep 30, 2019

Analyze Data

Meet the Team

Ella Norman
Ella Norman

Ella Norman

I am currently a student at Princeton High School in New Jersey. I am a second year member of my school's research program which allows a select group of students to explore any field of science that is of interest to them. I chose to explore the topic of social norms because it is an intersection between my two interests, social psychology and public policy.


Project Backers

  • 5Backers
  • 100%Funded
  • $875Total Donations
  • $175.00Average Donation
Please wait...