Erin Dillon

Erin Dillon

Sep 03, 2016

Group 6 Copy 30
0
    Please wait...

    About This Project

    How many sharks should there be on Caribbean reefs? Despite evidence suggesting that sharks once existed in numbers unheard of today, this critical question remains unanswered. We discovered that sharks leave a record of their presence in the form of dermal denticles, the tiny, tooth-like scales lining their skin, preserved in reef sediments. We are now pioneering denticles as an ecological tool to reconstruct pre-human shark baselines and supplement surveys on modern reefs.

    Blast off!

    Browse Other Projects on Experiment

    Related Projects

    Ash Swamps of the Willamette Valley: Havens of Biodiversity

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) is spreading west and is expected to heavily impact Oregon ash forests when...

    Azolla, a little fern with massive green potential

    Azolla is a symbiotic superorganism that captures all the nitrogen fertilizer it needs to grow from the...

    Mapping Salmon Spawning Sites with UAVs

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), often referred to as drones, offer a far cheaper and safer alternative...

    Backer Badge Funded