Erin Dillon

Erin Dillon

Feb 21, 2017

Group 6 Copy 17
0
    Please wait...

    About This Project

    How many sharks should there be on Caribbean reefs? Despite evidence suggesting that sharks once existed in numbers unheard of today, this critical question remains unanswered. We discovered that sharks leave a record of their presence in the form of dermal denticles, the tiny, tooth-like scales lining their skin, preserved in reef sediments. We are now pioneering denticles as an ecological tool to reconstruct pre-human shark baselines and supplement surveys on modern reefs.

    Blast off!

    Browse Other Projects on Experiment

    Related Projects

    What is the rate a new regenerative agricultural method sequesters carbon in the soil?

    Atmospheric levels of CO2 have risen 100 ppm. During this same period, the world's arable agricultural soils...

    Mycoremediation via proliferation of native terrestrial fungi

    Mycoremediation is a method of bioremediation, in which fungi are introduced into an environment, in order...

    Tree Climbing for Climate Change Research

    The tropical montane cloud forest provides important ecosystem services but is vulnerable to climate change...

    Backer Badge Funded