Erin Dillon

Erin Dillon

Feb 21, 2017

Group 6 Copy 14
0
    Please wait...

    About This Project

    How many sharks should there be on Caribbean reefs? Despite evidence suggesting that sharks once existed in numbers unheard of today, this critical question remains unanswered. We discovered that sharks leave a record of their presence in the form of dermal denticles, the tiny, tooth-like scales lining their skin, preserved in reef sediments. We are now pioneering denticles as an ecological tool to reconstruct pre-human shark baselines and supplement surveys on modern reefs.

    Blast off!

    Browse Other Projects on Experiment

    Related Projects

    Probiotics for wild boreal toads facing a deadly fungal disease

    A fungal pathogen spread around the globe by human activities now threatens many amphibians, including boreal...

    Where Did the Terrapins Go? A Population and Health Assessment

    The Diamondback terrapin, a threatened species, is a key species in the salt marsh. This study will capture...

    What comes in must go out: honey bee hive economics and food allocation

    The aim of this study is to connect foraging activity of honey bees (Apis mellifera) to incoming food supply...

    Backer Badge Funded