Andrew Wright

Andrew Wright

Apr 16, 2016

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    About This Project

    All animals sleep, but cetaceans engage in unihemispherical sleep, where brainwaves show that only half the brain sleeps at a time. Most studies of cetacean sleep have been in captivity. Reports of confirmed sleeping behaviour in the wild are rare. Expanding on findings of potential sleep behaviour in tagged harbour porpoise, we will review videos of bottlenose dolphins in the Red Sea to see if the same behaviours are present and can be linked to closed eyes: a strong indication of sleeping.

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    A biology project funded by 25 people