researcher
David Hone

David Hone

London, UK

Dr. David Hone is a researcher and British paleontologist at the University of Bristol specializing in dinosaurs and pterosaurs. He has a degree in zoology, a masters in taxonomy, and a PhD in palaeontology. Over the past few years, Dr. Hone has spent time working in Germany, Mexico, China, and Ireland.

Paleontologist, Queen Mary, University of London

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Published on Aug 20, 2015

Pterosaur paper is out

Well the second bonus paper is now published, also in PeerJ: https://peerj.com/articles/1191/ This was a bit unexpected (well I knew I'd submitted it, but not that it would be out today) so I don't...

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Published on Apr 09, 2015

Done

Well, that's it. The paper is now published and available at PeerJ here: https://peerj.com/articles/885/I've naturally got some commentary up myself in various places, so you can read the short and...

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Published on Apr 08, 2015

Final Countdown

Well it's now less than 24 hours till the paper is published. It will be out and online very soon in PeerJ. Not that this is a measure of success, but the journal and the media have taken a strong ...

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Published on Mar 07, 2015

Reviews

Well the reviews of the paper are back and they are generally positive, so Darren and I are working on the corrections and obviously fingers crossed it will go through OK. As part of the submission...

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Published on Jan 08, 2015

Manuscript Submitted!

Well, it's done and sent to PeerJ. Obviously we'll have to see how the editors / referees respond, but fingers crossed this will be liked and will go through. I have included all the names of spons...

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Published on Dec 16, 2014

Done!

Well it has taken rather longer than hoped / planned, but I have finally complete the manuscript. The paper is written (just over 10 000 words worth), the references and especially the figures (17 ...

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Published on Sep 20, 2014

More progress

Hello all! Well I know it has been another age since this has been updated, but things are finally moving again after some unfortunate and unavoidable delays with things, the project is moving agai...

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Published on May 05, 2014

Update!

Well it's been a while since I put an update on here, though they have been tricking in on the Facebook page I created for the project. If you are not on this, do let me know and I can add you in.I...

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Published on Mar 17, 2013

Made it!

Thanks again to everyone who has contributed in various ways with their time and effort, it's much appreciated. I'll wait till the funding period has closed before doing anything else on this and o...

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Published on Mar 17, 2013

So close!

Just a quick note to say thank you once again to all those who have contributed to the support of this project. All your Facebook likes, tweets, blog posts, and of course, in particular, donations ...

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Published on Feb 17, 2013

Sponsor the project and win signed dinosaur art

Award-winning palaeoartist Luis Rey has kindly stepped in to offer up a new piece of artwork to help support the project. Luis has created this image showing a pair of tyrannosaurines locked in com...

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Published on Feb 13, 2013

Budget

Astute observers will have spotted that the target for this project has dropped recently. When this was first put together, naturally I budgeted for all the various costs and set this as the target...

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Hi Matt, no problem at all! Happy to do so. :)
Dec 16, 2014
Cannibalism in Giant Tyrannosaurs
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Well obviously it may potentially be very hard if not impossible, but it can be worked on. The key issue is going to be tooth spacing - since this has yet to be looked at by researchers, we don't yet know if it's possible, but the typical spacing between teeth is definitely different between some theropods (I've checked this for a previous paper on bite marks). Sp by measuring the teeth positions in a series of each, we can build up a profile of the spacing and try to match either to the marks. In terms of feeding patterns, every specimen is important because they are so rare. However, some feeding patterns are already clear for tyrannosaurs (they use a combination of scrape feeding and bite-and-drag feeding) and it's been suggested that they were selective feeders and varies the feeding strategy according to the food at hand. This specimen can help confirm or challenge this hypothesis depending on the types of bites and their location on the skull and mandible.
Mar 19, 2013
Cannibalism in Giant Tyrannosaurs
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Well I'd like to think it's not too bad, it's not a huge number of people would need to provide something like 10 dollars. Every little helps of course though, and I'd like to think I've built up a fair bit of goodwill via the various blogs and sites. Last count I'm up to about 1500 blog posts of palaeontology and science communication and nearly 1000 answers on Ask A Biologist. :)
Jan 25, 2013
Cannibalism in Giant Tyrannosaurs
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Thanks so much to the first sponsors, it's very kind of you.
Jan 24, 2013
Cannibalism in Giant Tyrannosaurs
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