Gabriel Brandt

Gabriel Brandt

Franklin & Marshall College Johns Hopkins School of Public Health Brandeis University Caltech Reed College

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Published on Mar 23, 2016

Beware of hemogoblins!

This is an actual scanning electron microscopy image that Ben took this summer. It's a red blood cell in the late (trophozoite) stage of P. falciparum infection. On the right, I've ...

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Published on Mar 20, 2016

From cell to gel

So, how do we go from wretched-smelling bacterial cultures to the TV-friendly protein gel closeup? It's not too high-tech, really. The first thing we do is to grind up the bacteria and get the prot...

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Published on Mar 17, 2016

PA to CA!

In just a few weeks, the lab heads to San Diego, to present our preliminary results at the 2016 national meeting of the ASBMB. It's like a science fair for adults, with posters and ...

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Published on Mar 17, 2016

The scent of success

Universal disgust face! Two wrongs don't make a right, as these age-old human enemies combine in a culture flask. These are E. coli bacteria carrying the gene for a virulence factor...

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Awesome! May your red cells stay smooth.
Mar 07, 2016
Can we keep malaria parasites from making red blood cells sticky?
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That's a great question. To some extent, red blood cells sticking together is normal physiology. For example, in wound healing, fibrinogen will help the cells to clump together in order to form clots and stop bleeding. I don't know that too many pathogens do it, though. There's some evidence that sickle-cell trait and beta-thalassemia are protective against malaria in part because they make it harder for malaria parasites to make the cells sticky.
Mar 07, 2016
Can we keep malaria parasites from making red blood cells sticky?
View comment