Can gelatine lifters collect human DNA off trafficked animal specimens?

University of Edinburgh
London, England
BiologyEcology
DOI: 10.18258/12276
$811
Raised of $800 Goal
101%
Funded on 5/18/19
Successfully Funded
  • $811
    pledged
  • 101%
    funded
  • Funded
    on 5/18/19

About This Project

We hypothesize that human DNA can be collected off of animal specimens using forensic gelatin lifters. We will recruit 20 volunteers, who will provide a DNA sample and handle 3 animal specimens, feathers, ivory and reptile skin. We will use the gels to attempt to collect human DNA from the specimens, then compare samples against the volunteers DNA profiles.

If successful, gelatin lifters could prove a cheap quick method for identifying humans guilty of trafficking wildlife.

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What is the context of this research?

The illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is currently one of the biggest threats to species globally and is responsible for the demise of recognisable animals such as rhino, elephant, pangolin and even parrots. Fuelled by demands for parts used in traditional medicine and as trophies for the elite, the IWT has even been linked to organised crime. The industry is now estimated to be worth up to $10 billion a year, excluding timber and fish, making it a lucrative and attractive endeavour for criminals.

As long as these animals are worth more dead than alive, the IWT will persist and people will risk poaching. By establishing reliable methods of catching these criminals we move a step further from making such risks worthwhile.

What is the significance of this project?

Current efforts involved in tackling the IWT vary from community and education projects, all the way up to policy change and trade controls.

One gap in these efforts is the capture and prosecution of individuals, with arrests often confined to those without significant influence in the wider trade. Additionally, a report by an international law firm identified that most countries involved in prosecutions have severely lacking systems in place to successfully bring even these lesser criminals to justice.

There is a need to see which existing methods in forensic investigation can be applied to wildlife crime cases. Obtaining human trace evidence off of animal parts seems a natural bridge between current forensic capabilities and progression towards prosecutions.

What are the goals of the project?

We hypothesize that gelatine lifters can be used to lift human DNA off of trafficked animal specimens. This will be tested through the recruitment of 20 volunteers, who will provide a DNA sample and handle 3 animal specimens, including ivory, reptile skin and feathers. After the volunteer has handled each specimen their fingerprints will be lifted using gelatin lifters.

The gels will then be processed to extract and amplify any human DNA present. A total of 148 fingerprints will be collected and processed, 2 per specimen per volunteer. Any DNA successfully collected from the specimens will be matched against the volunteer profiles.

Budget

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These consumables are essential for the extraction of DNA samples successfully collected off of specimens using the gelatin lifters. This kit allows for 200 samples to be processed. We anticipate 148 samples from 20 volunteers providing 2 fingerprints per specimen (feather, reptile skin, ivory) so a single kit will allow for repetitions if required and the inclusion of a fourth specimen if one becomes available.

These figures are enough for quality statistical analysis and will provide an insight into not only whether the procedure works but which types of specimens this procedure may be most suitable for.

The results may help to make informed decisions about where this type of methodology could be deployed, based on the species, to help tackle the illegal wildlife trade. The more we know about the potential uses of these gels the more we can advise and encourage their use in relevant forensic investigations.

Endorsed by

This project will inevitably show if the novel approach can be implemented in forensics. Although gelatine lifters have been shown to have a range of applications, we are interested in the black gelatine lifters and their potential to tackle wildlife crime. Alex has been working with us at the Institute of Zoology/ZSL to develop this innovative method and train in forensic techniques. As a supervisor, she has my full and enthusiastic endorsement.

Flag iconProject Timeline

I hope to have all sample collection and the majority of laboratory work finished by end the of May 2019. The project should be completed and written up in full by June 2019.

The report will be produced as a PDF MSc project report to the required specifications set by University of Edinburgh and shared as a lab note via the project page on the experiment platform.

Jan 31, 2019

Volunteer fingerprinting on three animal specimens (feather, ivory, reptile skin)

Apr 11, 2019

DNA extraction and amplification

Apr 18, 2019

Project Launched

Aug 01, 2019

Profile matching results

Sep 01, 2019

Project Report

Meet the Team

Alexandra Thomas
Alexandra Thomas

Affiliates

Zoological Society of London
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Alexandra Thomas

For the past 3 years I have dedicated myself to studying on my MSc alongside having full-time job in the field of wildlife conservation. I am lucky I work in an environment where continued learning is always encouraged and I believe people working together and supporting each other, whether as members of the public or as professors in institutes or Universities, is the key to helping efforts in wildlife conservation. I enjoy being around people who share the same passions as me but also recognise the uphill struggle we are all facing to fix the problems the world is facing.

I know I am in a privileged position to be able to study and work in a subject I am passionate about and my hope is that any advances I can make in tackling the illegal wildlife trade are ones that can be utilised and put to use by those people and countries which are on the front-line of the illegal wildlife trade battle who have the additional experience and knowledge needed to implement them successfully.


Project Backers

  • 14Backers
  • 101%Funded
  • $811Total Donations
  • $57.93Average Donation
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