researcher
Rowena Hamer

Rowena Hamer

University of Tasmania

PhD researcher

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Haven't backed any projects yet! 

Thanks so much Edward- nice to have such committed supporters! Yes it's true that animal recognition is the main thing we're focusing on- at this stage we're leaving the engineering to John Read (the trap developer) and his collaborators, but we will certainly reach out if we need additional help! Check out Hugh's lab note here on 'Background to the Felixer' for more details on how the trap recognises different species here: https://experiment.com/u/CPvzVQ
Jun 19, 2016
Is the Felixer cat trap safe for native carnivores?
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Thanks so much Phillip :)
Jun 19, 2016
Is the Felixer cat trap safe for native carnivores?
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Very true- Hugh actually used dogs as part of his previous cat research in the Kimberley. I think with feral cats there's never going to be one magic bullet, it's just about having as many control options as we can to fit all the different situations. Thanks again for your support of this project!
Jun 16, 2016
Is the Felixer cat trap safe for native carnivores?
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Thanks so much for the donation! We agree about the devastating impact of cats, hopefully this is one step in the right direction :). We have spoken to the site about the $US, they are trying to fix it for the future but are unlikely to get something done for our project. If you'd like to change the amount, just let us know and we can put you in touch with the site co-ordinators to sort it out. Thanks again
Jun 16, 2016
Is the Felixer cat trap safe for native carnivores?
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Hi Adrian, those are definitely valid concerns and I'll do my best to answer them! Firstly, with regards to the poison used: this device is not in commercial development yet, and it's likely that the poison used and the dose rates will have to be tailored for different environments. To the best of our understanding, one of the most likely poisons that would be used is PAPP (para-aminopropiophenone). When a suitable dose is administered, it is fast acting (typically killing the animal in around 2 hours) and acts by reducing oxygen in the blood. This means the animals become sleepy and lethargic before dying. The poison also degrades fairly quickly in the environment and has a low risk of being passed up the food chain through animals scavenging on poisoned carcasses. You can find more information on this poison here: http://www.pestsmart.org.au/papp-for-wild-dog-and-fox-control/. I should stress we won't be using poison in these trials yet! And some further work would be required to work out the optimal dose required. Secondly, with regard to pet cats. This is definitely an issue if the trap is going to be used in urban areas (less so in wilderness or remote areas). I believe there is some work currently underway to try to incorporate a microchip scanner into the device which would disable the firing mechanism if it detects a microchip within the firing range for this exact reason. I'm not sure where that work is up to, however. I hope that helps to answer your questions, let me know if I can answer anything else!
Jun 16, 2016
Is the Felixer cat trap safe for native carnivores?
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Thanks so much Jenny! We are pretty excited about this project and will keep you all informed on how it's running along.
Jun 16, 2016
Is the Felixer cat trap safe for native carnivores?
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