Susanne Jul

Susanne Jul

Los Altos CA

Creative Crisis Leadership

Senior Researcher

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Published on Aug 06, 2019

"They sent everybody to the cafeteria, if I can remember, that had no pants."

It’s been a while since my last lab note. This was, in part, because I have been doing some paid work. But mainly, it was because I had to take care of a tedious, time-consuming, critical task.You ...

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Published on May 08, 2019

"... it just went from bad to worse."

In the last lab note, we saw that organization at the shelter really failed after dinner. This pretty much coincided with the shutdown of external services, the storm intensifying, a late rush of p...

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Published on Apr 30, 2019

12 hours from order to chaos

Unlike many sudden crises, there was no single triggering event that caused matters to go from calm to crisis in Rockport. We have examined the rapid development of the storm, and the short time pe...

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Published on Apr 24, 2019

Going inside the shelter

Now that we have a framework for examining the factors that might have influenced helping behaviors, let’s see what the inside of Live Oak Learning Center was like during the storm.Over the next se...

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Published on Apr 20, 2019

The frog jumps (or not) when…

So we don’t have to go fishing through the last few lab notes, here is an overview of the forces and factors that moderate the Bystander Effect.Sources of forcesIn reflecting on my grouping into th...

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Published on Apr 18, 2019

Wait, what about the frog?

The research on the Bystander Effect that we reviewed leaves some questions unanswered. This could be because of limitations in my literature search, or it could be that these questions haven’t bee...

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Published on Apr 15, 2019

Review of the Bystander Effect Research Review

The brief review of research on the Bystander Effect suggests that there are three forces acting on an individual’s decision of whether to act in a critical situation. First, the sights, sounds, sm...

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Published on Apr 11, 2019

Reducing the Bystander Effect

As discussed, there are a number of factors that magnify the Bystander Effect. Fortunately, there are also a number of factors that weaken it. Once again, factors can be divided into characteristic...

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Published on Apr 06, 2019

Magnifying the Bystander Effect

Factors that magnify the Bystander Effect—making people less likely to take action to help in a critical situation—can be divided into two categories: characteristics of the situation, and characte...

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Thanks!
Sep 27, 2019
What personal qualities and situational factors enable someone rise to leadership in disaster?
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Thanks!
Jul 19, 2019
What personal qualities and situational factors enable someone rise to leadership in disaster?
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Thanks. It's been a joy to get back to it!
Apr 25, 2019
What personal qualities and situational factors enable someone rise to leadership in disaster?
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Ah, thank you! I can put it on my CV now :-)
Apr 06, 2019
What personal qualities and situational factors enable someone rise to leadership in disaster?
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And, thank you for your interest and support.
Apr 05, 2019
What personal qualities and situational factors enable someone rise to leadership in disaster?
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I'm looking forward to see what you learn about incorporating microclimate metrics in models. Understanding how the redwood forests might fare is of tremendous importance in public policy and planning.
Feb 20, 2019
Can coast redwood seedlings survive reduced fog and climate change in California?
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That is a very insightful observation! In my mind, I had lumped such benefits under “rewards.” There is definitely value in understanding different types of benefits/rewards/punishments/resources a leader might control. But, … For my purposes, the more important point you raise is separating control from source. The key attribute of Position is that authority is conferred by a third party. The leader has the backing and access to resources of that third party. However, someone could have independent control of resources, and rely on that as a source of leader authority. This could be a resource that is critical to the group’s success—“We can use my Dad’s barn!” Or, it could be vital to individual success—“I have water. If you want some, you’ll have to follow my rules.” There you have it. A sixth source of leader authority! One that may well be in play in many cases of spontaneous leadership, where we assume a lack of positional leaders. Either through absence of a third party or the abdication of its appointed leaders. In this case, the leader might have direct control of the resource ("my water"), or they might rely on personal influence with someone who has direct control ("Dad").
Feb 08, 2018
What personal qualities and situational factors enable someone rise to leadership in disaster?
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Yes, it comes in fits and starts!
Nov 29, 2017
What personal qualities and situational factors enable someone rise to leadership in disaster?
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It's hopeless. It's stripping out line breaks. I'll try some other routes.
Nov 07, 2017
What personal qualities and situational factors enable someone rise to leadership in disaster?
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Good question! The time dimension is important in much disaster research. Events are distinguished by how much advance warning there is (probability of occurrence combined with an actual event), how quickly damage occurs, and how long the damaging forces continue. In Barton’s words: "Changes coming without warning are likely to create greater loss, and leave the social system with less capacity to respond to the loss. If the change is gradual or predictable in advance, specific preparations to prevent or respond to the damage are much more likely to be made. If the impact is long-continued or recurring, as in a lasting depression, drought or the wartime bombings, long-range social adaptations can be worked out, either to minimize losses, to restore the system's functioning on another basis, or to lower the members aspirations to match the system's lower capacity to meet their needs. The disaster studies of the last twenty years fall into two main clusters. One consists of disasters to small communities or to small segments of cities, coming without much warning and meeting little institutional preparation. These are the tornadoes, accidental explosions, flash floods, and the like. The other cluster consists of the studies of the effects of World War II bombing raids— a recurring impact with a relatively high degree of institutional preparation, covering most of the cities of whole countries. If we go back to the 1930's we find large-scale economic stress on a similar national scale; a number of careful case studies of communities and regions in the grip of the depression were made, as well as studies of family groups under depression stress."
Nov 07, 2017
What personal qualities and situational factors enable someone rise to leadership in disaster?
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Good question! The time dimension is important in much disaster research. Events are distinguished by how much advance warning there is (probability of occurrence combined with an actual event), how quickly damage occurs, and how long the damaging forces continue. In Barton’s words: "Changes coming without warning are likely to create greater loss, and leave the social system with less capacity to respond to the loss. If the change is gradual or predictable in advance, specific preparations to prevent or respond to the damage are much more likely to be made. If the impact is long-continued or recurring, as in a lasting depression, drought or the wartime bombings, long-range social adaptations can be worked out, either to minimize losses, to restore the system's functioning on another basis, or to lower the members aspirations to match the system's lower capacity to meet their needs. The disaster studies of the last twenty years fall into two main clusters. One consists of disasters to small communities or to small segments of cities, coming without much warning and meeting little institutional preparation. These are the tornadoes, accidental explosions, flash floods, and the like. The other cluster consists of the studies of the effects of World War II bombing raids— a recurring impact with a relatively high degree of institutional preparation, covering most of the cities of whole countries. If we go back to the 1930's we find large-scale economic stress on a similar national scale; a number of careful case studies of communities and regions in the grip of the depression were made, as well as studies of family groups under depression stress."
Nov 07, 2017
What personal qualities and situational factors enable someone rise to leadership in disaster?
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I suspect that this trend for research to focus on the distinguishing time dimension has diminished, but may still be discernible. That is, research on events with advance warning has focused on warning systems and reactions to warnings, research on sudden-onset events has focused on response behaviors, and research on ongoing or recurring events has focused on long-term adaptations. But that is my biased perception, not based on any systematic analysis. That said, the context of bombing outside the main target areas in WWII is analogous to hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico or earthquakes on the Pacific Rim: high probability of an event overall, but low for any given community. There might well be historical studies from other countries that fit that profile. -------- Disaster Research Group. Field studies of disaster behavior: an inventory. Disaster Study Number 14. Washington: National Academy of Sciences — National Research Council, 1961.
Nov 07, 2017
What personal qualities and situational factors enable someone rise to leadership in disaster?
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