researcher
Dr Kathryn Hall

Dr Kathryn Hall

Brisbane

Queensland Museum

Research Officer

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Haven't created any projects yet! 

Hi Bowen, I have been watching your study with interest. I am not sure who is advising you, but you are not accurate here with what you are saying. BLAST searching IS quantifiable, and IS objective. It is done algorithmically by a computer - there is absolutely no subjectivity involved and the output provides a number of metrics to assess the similarity of the sequences to others in the database. It is nice to see you having a go, but your work is not visible to peer-reviewers and has not been assessed for its scientific accuracy or the rigour of your interpretations. You really should not presume to be so didactic, especially when you are not correct in what you say. I find myself disagreeing with much of what you write ("unnecessary parts" of sequences...what are those?). Please listen to the advice of more experienced people. Enthusiasm is great, but the tortoise beat the hare in the end. Best wishes, Kathryn
Aug 16, 2017
The Ideal Molecular Barcode for Identifying Freshwater Green Algae (Chlorophyceae)
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Hi Corey, I empathise with you. Funding seems more elusive by the day. I wish all the best and sincerely hope you reach your goal. Best wishes, Kathryn
Aug 16, 2017
Crowdfund My Postdoc! Seasonal Movements of Lionfish in Bermuda
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Thanks for the question Dirk. The project focuses very specifically on looking at only one group of sponges from the Family Tetillidae. These are classified within a group called Spirophorina. The reason I have chosen to have such a narrow taxonomic focus is to invest in depth, rather than breadth, for this study. By covering many individuals within a smaller taxonomic range, I will be able to look at questions of specificity of the bacteria for these sponges. Because tetillid sponges have been demonstrated to have bioactive compounds in them (that is chemical compounds which can act on animal cells), particularly tumour-suppressing agents, it is particularly important that I can get a good and thorough understanding of the precise diversity of bacteria in each sponge species. If the bacterial community composition is shown to be specific for each species of sponge, this will impact the research of drug biodiscovery chemists, in that they will know which sponges to target in their research. Further, if specificity in the bacterial community is can be demonstrated, having the composition of a sponge microbiome known and stored in a database will provide an efficient way that scientists and researchers can use to quickly identify sponges. Sponge researchers around the world are looking at the microbiomes of many other groups, but this is the first study that I know of that will look in such depth at one particular taxonomic group. That said, I will be including a number of other specimens from other groups (like Theonellidae and Ancorinidae) which have been collected from the same location to assess whether to the populations are regionally specific or taxonomically specific. Based on the results of this study, I would like to expand my taxonomic focus to include other groups of sponges from the Great Barrier Reef in coming years.
Aug 07, 2017
Do sponges have unique bacterial communities?
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Well done Alessandra! I hope there are lots of species too!!
Jul 24, 2017
Harvestmen (Arachnids) in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest
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John, thanks so much for your comments. I agree absolutely that the potential for microbiome sequencing is enormous in terms of building our capacity as taxonomists to rapidly identify species of sponges. Further, I believe it will enhance our understanding of what a "species" actually is. I am excited about the chance to get going on this project and build some meaningful data profiles for these sponges.
Jul 04, 2017
Do sponges have unique bacterial communities?
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Thanks so much for your comments John. I agree absolutely that the potential for microbiome sequencing is enormous in terms of building our capacity as taxonomists to rapidly identify species of sponges. Further, I believe it will enhance our understanding of what a "species" actually is. I am excited about the chance to get going on this project and build some meaningful data profiles for these sponges.
Jul 04, 2017
Do sponges have unique bacterial communities?
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Thanks so much for your comments John. I agree absolutely that the potential for microbiome sequencing is enormous in terms of building our capacity as taxonomists to rapidly identify species of sponges. Further, I believe it will enhance our understanding of what a "species" actually is. I am excited about the chance to get going on this project and build some meaningful data profiles for these sponges.
Jul 04, 2017
Do sponges have unique bacterial communities?
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