Markus Friedrich

Markus Friedrich

Professor

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Published on Jan 28, 2019

Raising a hot question

In light of the cold spell of a week coming up here in Detroit and the fantastic response to the recent post. It's been truly great to see that the cave beetle's fan base is going strong. So, I cha...

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Published on Jan 08, 2019

Ptomaphagus hirtus now at least 5 million years old

Ptomaphagus hirtus now at least 5 million years oldHello there, dear friends of the cave beetle, and happy new year... ! Writing this post, I am realizing that 2018 went by without a single update...

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Published on Nov 03, 2017

2017 Cave beetle talk at Ferris State University

2017 Cave beetle talk at Ferris State UniversityThis event was initiated per kind invitation by Neaphaenops expert David Griffith and the Biology Department Chair Beth Zimmer. They were wonderful h...

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Published on Oct 05, 2017

2017 Circadian Clock Nobel Konopka Correction

Hello there everyone, And many thanks for your fantastic feedback on the previous post, reflecting on recipients and non-recipients of the 2017 Nobel prize honoring the discovery of the circadian c...

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Published on Oct 02, 2017

2017 Nobel prize honors the discovery of the circadian clock gene network

2017 Nobel prize honors the discovery of the circadian clock gene networkHello there everyone! Some of you might have guessed that we are, of course, very excited about today's news that the Nobel ...

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Published on Sep 25, 2017

September 2017 field collection completed

September 2017 field collection completedHello there everyone,Glad to let you know we, and many beetles, made it well back on September 26th, after completing our final collecting at Dogwood cave a...

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Published on Sep 23, 2017

Sonya is presenting a poster on P. hirtus circadian rhythm entertainment at Sensorium 2017 in Cincinnati: The first rendition of a planned annual meeting of sensory biologists and ecologists: http://sensoriumconference.org/

Sonya is presenting a poster on P. hirtus circadian rhythm entertainment at Sensorium 2017 in Cincinnati: The first rendition of a planned annual meeting of sensory biologists and ecologists: http:...

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Published on Sep 23, 2017

September 2017 cave beetle field collection travelogue

September 2017 cave beetle field collection travelogueHello there everyone,It's been a while we had something (including time) to post. But these days are post-worthy because we are spending time a...

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OK people. 8 votes in meaning 2 guesses away from disclosure. Come on, we can do this! Recovering from polar vortex time...
Jan 31, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
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Jeff's excellent comment warrants some more information: In our experiment, short-term tolerance was defined as survival for 5 days. We started the experimental cultures at 11 degrees Celsius and increased the temperature by 2 degrees every 5 days. If anyone feels compelled to revise their initial guesstimate, please go ahead!
Jan 29, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
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Wow. Halfway there in 24 hours. And a very interesting spread of temps... Glad I started this. 4 more guesstimates needed. Polls will be open until the weekend no matter what! Thanks for everyone's input so far.
Jan 29, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
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Genes potentially showing degeneration in P. hirtus: For this, we would need the genome sequence... which we've asked to be funded quite a number of times in the past (Hello NSF!). And comparative transcriptomes from surface relatives. Based on the transcriptome data we published in 2011 (doi: 10.1242/jeb.060368), I would think the eye pigmentation genes we couldn't detect to be expressed represent candidates for genes in the process of degeneration.
Jan 18, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
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Hi there Steve! Great point of course. The number of 5 million years as the age of P. hirtus age is indeed based on the simplifying assumption that there were no further, now extinct lineages that branched off the terminal branch to P. hirtus in our tree. A more careful statement would be that our tree times the origin of the last common ancestor that gave rise to modern P. hirtus plus possibly extinct relatives in relation to the other members of the hirtus-group. While the paleontological evidence is, to the best of my knowledge, too limited to explore this, we are hopeful to get further insights some day by timing the onset of gene degeneration related to cave colonization and adaptation, which be great to compare to the subterranean dytiscids and other subterranean clades.
Jan 14, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
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Very understandable and crossed my mind for a moment as well. I made the opposite decision thinking that one of the many beauties of this platform is that it allows us to support initiatives that are inspired by the betterment of science, the environment, and humankind, regardless of the broader counterproductive contexts from within which they have to originate, most likely not by choice, and therefore particularly commendable. Glad this got funded. And very much looking forward to the benefits of the approach.
Jan 11, 2019
Creating a neural network that classifies Dinoflagellate species
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Hi Spela, It was great to meet you at the conference and learn about your progress. Thanks for the post which nicely captures the stunning eDNA developments in the subterranean field. Best of luck with the Planina Cave project!
Aug 31, 2018
Through a glass darkly: assessing population size of an endangered cave salamander from samples of spring and cave water
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Awesome! Keeping fingers crossed...
Mar 29, 2018
Finding the ancestral roots of female orgasm
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Excellent. Much enjoyed
Nov 09, 2017
Engage Kayamandi Youth in Cape Citizen Science with Vision Afrika
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No worries. One day... it's either you, the NSF, or better, of course, both
Nov 04, 2017
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
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Tx so much for double checking the presentation. I will let NSF know. There sure is great enthusiastic people here
Nov 03, 2017
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
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Hi there Tom, And many thanks for your comment. We do strongly feel that Dogwood Cave (and in 2013 White Cave) include P. hirtus distributions that leak into the twilight zone. We further think that the light levels matter with respect to the sensitivity and light tolerance of the visual system, but not on the fact of whether can be entrained, i.e. continue to cycle in continued darkness. But we fully agree that the effect of light intensity should, and can, be explored in depth. As in many earlier cave beetle studies, mostly Trechini though.
Oct 04, 2017
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
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