Markus Friedrich

Markus Friedrich

Professor

More

Published on Feb 29, 2020

Off topic but irresistible: Cave beetle awed by riveting discovery of troglomorphic fish in Congo River

That's actually all that needs to be said. For details, check out the wonderful coverage in the New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/25/science/congo-river-fish.htmlI trust most of you w...

Group 6 Copy 346
Published on Feb 16, 2020

~ 4 degrees Celsius is how low the cave beetle can still "go"

Or: Literally cool news as February has been dishing out a crispy few days closer to 0 Fahrenheit here in Detroit than you would like. Not sure this inspired us, but, as we thought about how to set...

Group 6 Copy 294
Published on Dec 29, 2019

30 degrees Celsius it is!

Hello there dear friends of the cave beetle,As expected, the repeat of the 2019 short term temperature tolerance experiment has come to an end. And an informative one at that, I would claim. Most s...

Group 6 Copy 297
Published on Dec 20, 2019

Another larva: After 5 days at 26 degrees Celsius!

Hello there, This is a short post as the title sums up what we found on the female test plate a few days back and blew our mind, again. This finding once more expands the temperature range at which...

Group 6 Copy 290
Published on Dec 15, 2019

Cave beetle surprises with offspring at 22 degrees Celsius

Hello there again dear friends of the cave beetle, and many thanks for your kind feedback on the previous 18 degrees Celsius note! I am pretty excited to find myself in the position to update you o...

Group 6 Copy 259
Published on Nov 30, 2019

Long term temperature tolerance raised to 18 degrees Celsius

Hello there friends of the cave beetle, a few weeks back I didn't expect to have much to report for the near future, but the cave beetle proved me wrong. You may remember last report on the first a...

Group 6 Copy 323
Published on Oct 10, 2019

First 18 degrees Celsius cave beetle offspring!

First 18 degrees Celsius cave beetle offspring!Hello there everyone, And my apology for the flimsy smart phone cave beetle microscope shot. But you are looking at one of two adults that I found on ...

Group 6 Copy 258
Published on Oct 01, 2019

33 16 degrees Celsius cave beetles later

It's officially October now, and I haven't seen any new beetles emerging from the 16 degrees culture place since September 17th. Moreover, the last larvae were transferred into this plate on July 1...

Group 6 Copy 328
Published on Jul 27, 2019

Delighted to announce the first 16 degree Celsius cave beetle lab offspring

First seen on Tuesday July the 23rd to be exact. But the clip below was taken 2 days later on Thursday. It shows one (still camera shy) of at least 3 adults on the plate that was populated with the...

Group 6 Copy 270
Show more updates
Let me also take this as another opportunity to credit WSU undergrad supreme Devyn Ryan. She single-handedly wrapped up all experimentation and documentation over the past 2 weeks after a very short training time and never minding the holidays. Just impressive. Many many thanks Ryan!
Dec 29, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
View comment
Thank you. Absolutely. While we still have a mile or 2 to what I would consider "mimimal publication unit", I do feel we accomplished our main goal with this. And topped off with a quite surprising answer. So I am sure the cave beetles agree about party time, except for the sadly deceased ones of course, deserving special commemoration...
Dec 29, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
View comment
Update: 4 more swiftly moving 18 degress Celsius beetles collected this week. So it seems safe to conclude that this temperature is not a challenge for P. hirtus.
Oct 17, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
View comment
Glueckwunsch! Thanks for a great study. And for proving what this site can facilitate.
Oct 01, 2019
Finding the ancestral roots of female orgasm
View comment
You are right on the money again. Sensory appendage elongation is part of what is called the troglomorphic phenotype. The most striking aspect in the P. hirtus larvae are the long terminal cerci. Will post an annotated image this weekend (if time allows).
Jun 11, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
View comment
That is right indeed. Congratulations Qing and thank you for your insightful input! Turns out we are looking at a shed first larval instar cuticle or exoskeleton. This documents successful growth and development of the larvae on the 16 degrees Celsius plate. It's easy to grow in body size, but quite a challenge for any molting animal (Edysozoa) to break through the tightening grip of an outsized cuticle and leave it completely behind. So that's why this little piece of larval cuticle is a really encouraging finding.
Jun 11, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
View comment
Hi there Qing, Interesting guess. What exactly do you mean by "molt"?
Jun 10, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
View comment
Your kind words are much appreciated, Monique. The cave beetle friends will stay informed here. Promise!
May 21, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
View comment
Hello there Tom, and many thanks for drawing attention to Hadenoecus subterraneus (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hadenoecus), the cave beetle's food supplier. Indeed, I fully agree with that our data imply Hadenoecus subterraneus's well being as the more immediately pressing issue when it comes to the potential effects of global warming on P. hirtus.
May 07, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
View comment
Hello there Tom, and many thanks for drawing the attention to Hadenoecus subterraneus (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hadenoecus), the cave beetle's food supplier. Indeed, I fully agree with that our data imply Hadenoecus subterraneus's well being as the more immediately pressing issue when it comes to the potential effects of global warming on P. hirtus.
May 07, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
View comment
Hello there Tom, and many thanks for drawing the attention to Hadenoecus subterraneus (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hadenoecus), the cave beetle's food supplier. Indeed, I fully agree with that our data indeed imply that Hadenoecus subterraneus's well being would become the more immediately pressing issue when it comes to the potential effects of global warming on P. hirtus.
May 07, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
View comment
OK people. 8 votes in meaning 2 guesses away from disclosure. Come on, we can do this! Recovering from polar vortex time...
Jan 31, 2019
Exploring the temperature tolerance of a cave beetle
View comment
Show more comments